a Super Bowl on a Hot Stove

If you are looking for a serious post, you'll have to come back another day...

I've always enjoyed Jim Armstrong's notes columns in the Denver Post and have felt that his approach to newspaper articles would be a better fit as a notes blog - that way the author can assume people know what he is talking about while providing a link to give more information to people who are confused. In honor of all newspapers in English, here's my notes blog for the day...

I like Indianapolis over Chicago for Super Bowl XLI. But I'm almost always wrong...

That said, I have to listen to the home team broadcast of one of the two teams (I don't get the national broadcast on NFL Fieldpass) so I will be listening to the crew from Chicago because they broadcast more like a national crew (and then I will probably be re-listening to the winning call from Indy).

Can I be the first person to say that although Super Bowl XL was the coolest Super Bowl year ever, something has to be done before we get to Super Bowl L. Please, please NFL, go away from the traditional Roman numerals for that one - even Super Bowl 50 would be better than Super Bowl L.

From super bowls to hot stoves...

Once the final gun sounds on XLI we begin the driest season of the year: 58 sport-less days until Opening Day. I guess there's always hockey, golf and the NBA.

The biggest news out of the hot stove league is not whether Andy Pettitte will effectively replace the Big Unit, or what team the Rocket will be pitching for come October. No, the biggest news in baseball is who is on the iSquad.

iPods are certainly everywhere these days. Talk about a monopoly... when will Steve Jobs start getting the bad press Bill Gates gets?

My question for Major League Baseball is this: When Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens (finally) do retire, will they be the last of the great nicknames in baseball?

Another interesting conversation in the hot stove league has to do with the possibility of a Major League Baseball team in Portland. I'd love to see it happen, but in the meantime the Salem-Keiser Volcanoes put a pretty good product on the field.

To finish this notes blog, I might as well plagiarize the conclusion of one of Armstrong's recent articles (is it plagerism if you cite the source? I think I've been working with the AOF director on his dissertation too long)...

...finally, today's golden-oldie quote, courtesy of Hank Aaron: 'It took me 17 years to get 3,000 hits in baseball. I did it in one afternoon on the golf course.'

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